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20130107
20130115
STATION
CSPAN 6
CNN 4
CNNW 4
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
WETA 1
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX News
Jan 10, 2013 9:00am EST
to a wide variety of government agencies and passing that onto the fbi for inclusion in its database about who can and can not buy guns. things that would indicate mental health problems, what have you. i think there are also potentially looking at recess appointing the head of the atf, the alcohol, tobacco and firearms bureau, which hasn't had a head since 2006. those are a couple of things that the white house might be looking at doing sort of on its own. bill: we're about to dive back into the debt fight and the spending issues in washington. mitch mcconnell says that will take up the next few months of time. >> yeah. bill: so you start now to see the strategy as to why the white house would pursue executive action if they follow what the president said after newtown, that he is not going to delay on this. >> right. it's been interesting. we've seen the white house of course do this. for a white house that came in, a president that came in having railed in the 2008 campaign against sort of the overreach of executive power, he has shown very little restraint in using executive power hims
CNN
Jan 9, 2013 5:00pm PST
. they have been identified by the fbi and not prosecuted by the department of justice. and there are also the national instant criminal background check mechanism is not fully funded by the government but could be and that could pro prevent people like the shooter at virginia tech. it would have sent a red flag that there is mental illness in his background and maybe he shouldn't be able to buy a gun. >> i totally disagree. there is no common ground in this argument. >> the there is zero. the national rifle association and most of the united states congress is against any sort of regulation of guns. period. >> that is simply not true. david keen on this channel, on cnn said he is in favor of people with mental illness be registered. >> he wants the loop hole of 40% of people who buy guns not to have a background check. >> that is a different point. >> do you want to register people, i mean that is a non starter -- you can't have a database on people with guns or anybody who has received psychiatric counseling. >> the nra is in favor of it. to say that there is no common ground is defeatin
CNN
Jan 9, 2013 7:00pm PST
identified by the fbis are turned over to the department of justice and not prosecuted by the department of justice. the administration could say prosecute people who are lying on their background checks. there are also the national instant criminal background check mechanism is not fully funded by the federal government but could be and that would prevent people like the shooter at virginia tech who had a mental illness in his background, it would have flagged and registered that there was a mental illness in his background. the government can fully fund programs already in existence that the nra wouldn't necessarily disagree with. >> i totally disagree. there is no common ground in this argument. >> what? >> there's zero common ground. the national rifle association and most of the united states congress is against any sort of regulation of guns period. >> that's simply not true. david king on this channel on cnn, has said he's in favor of not letting people who have mental illness be registered in this mental illness registry -- >> he wants the loophole to allow 40% of people not allo
CNN
Jan 10, 2013 1:00am PST
background checks on whether they could legally obtain a gun. they have been identified by the fbi, turned over by the justice department, and not processed. the administration could say prosecute people who are lying on their background checks. there are also the national instant criminal background check mechanism, is not fully funded by the federal government, but could be. and that would prevent people like the shooter at virginia tech who had a mental illness in his background, would have registered him. when he went to buy his gun, it would have sent a red flag there is a mental illness in the background, maybe he shouldn't be legally able to buy a gun. there are things the federal government can do, fully-funded programs that are already in existence, that the nra wouldn't necessarily disagree with. >> i totally disagree. there is no common ground in this argument. >> what? >> the nra, there is zero common ground. the national rifle association and most of the united states congress is against any sort of regulation of guns, period. i mean -- >> that is simply not true. david keen o
FOX News
Jan 13, 2013 9:00am PST
by the fbi and i cia couldn't get the results of the interview because they are worried about compromising the investigation. we are going back to treating crime. we don't know who changed the talking points to take al-qaeda references out of the talking points given susan rice three weeks before the election. we don't know anything. i don't want to hold up but i will until we get to the bottom of benghazi. in case the administration is listening to this program you are not going forward on these nominations until you share with the congress with really happened in benghazi. >> shannon: do you have support across the aisle at all for the proposition? i'm sure there are democrats who would also like answers to that question. >> i would be shocked if the democratic party would not at least join in the effort to find out what the president did during the attack, who did change the talking points. why are we now you back to a pre9/11 model of where the fbi can't talk to the cia. i hope they are interested in that. >> shannon: have you been given any timeline for the investigations wrapping up?
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 5:30pm EST
of national intelligence, and the national security elements of the fbi were merged into the national security branch. these efforts were born of the need to institutionalize and facilitate information sharing, to bridge a gap that existed between intelligence and law- enforcement capabilities. on the heels of this change, it became evident that another service was in pretty high demand. it is what the commission called a thoughtful, innovative, and constructive legal guidance. following recommendations from the commission and others, the national security division was created in the department of justice to ensure unity of purpose among intelligence lawyers and the community on one hand with law-enforcement and prosecutors on the other. the division functions really reflect a removal of legal, structural, and cultural barriers. they have brought the department's national security elements under one roof and into closer alignment with those of the fbi and the rest of the national security community. as these lawyers work as terrorism and espionage prosecutors, they work as intelligence lawyers
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 7:00pm EST
briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigation and prosecution are all preserved. if you asked me to break down how much intelligence versus how much law enforcement work we do, i would be hard pressed to give you an answer. we are almost always pursuing multiple tracks at the same time. we no longer have to across organizational lines to bring tools and talent to bear against a particular threat or problem. for instance, our office lawyers in the office of intelligence work day in and day out with the intelligence community to secure authorities under the surveillance
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 2:00pm EST
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter-terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating and they teach each new about a boc of instruction on terrorism to reinforce the things that are taught at the f.b.i. academy. we also send them out around the nation to be able to work with joint terrorism task forces, which is not just f.b.i. people, but also law enforcement and others to educate them on the terrorist threat and the changes. and then creating a virtual network because of the connections of everybody on the internet so that when pracktigsners that are out there in police departments or the f.b.i. are studying a particular case or aspect of terrorism they can reach back into the literature and research at west point and get a little bit more expertise and the history and the background and the theory that they're able to do. >> what kind
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 10:30pm EST
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter- terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating terrorism center down to quantico, virginia, to the fbi academy, and they teach each new agent and new analyst instruction on terrorism to reinforce the kinds of things that are taught at the fbi academy. to come here and be informed about what we are doing to counter terrorism and where that is going. i'll tell you a little bit about that. i do want to state for all of you and especially for c-span these are my personal academic opinions and not the position of the united states government so they have that disclaimer out there. although, as you'll hear as i'm talking about it, i think it should be the position of the united states government. >> we know of osama bin lot and hiding and others hiding in various areas and in other places until the
LINKTV
Jan 7, 2013 3:00pm PST
with a small "a" and i was apprehended shortly after i appeared on your show by the fbi. for a number of reasons, because i felt the prosecution was political against myself, i chose to flee into exile. i am in canada now. my name is known to most people. you could research the and find out who i am. i have altered by apparent since have gone into exile. i took the name "x" because i kind of like it. >> has explained the video -- explain it to video that your group anonymous got ahold of, with this 12-minute video showed. >> it is apparent to anyone who can stomach watching of the entire 12 minutes. i, myself, we've been working night and day on this operation. i have watched it a dozen times and it makes me sick each time to watch it. i think it speaks for itself. these young men were sitting around immediately after the crime took place, which is clear from what they say in the video. one person even gets up at one point and leaves in disgust and goes to check on the victim to see if she is ok. the victim is still nearby. the crime is still in progress, in essence, when this video w
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 7:00am EST
interviewed. there were clues in the fbi. the fbi did not talk to the cia. we came up with a model that fixed the pentagon. the pentagon used to have the services staffing and fighting separate wars. they would equip themselves separately. we decided to do what the military did. a joint command was created. he can come from any military service. they now trained and equipped to gather. the dni is the joint commander across 16 intel agencies. he leverage is their strength to produce intel products. that is the backbone of how we get intelligence to policy makers and that has dramatically improved. on the fusion centers, that is a different thing. those are local centers that have gone up to serve local law enforcement. they pull together national intelligence streams that they get from the homeland security department or the fbi with streams of local intelligence and a share it. the homelands department has tried to insist on privacy in these agencies and provide some financial support. this is a work in progress. some of them worked very well. one in los angeles works very well. other communi
PBS
Jan 10, 2013 5:30pm PST
that in many this movie. there was an f.b.i. agent who walked out and said "i won't have anything to do with this, it's illegal, it's wrong, it's what our enemies do." there's not a character in this movie who raises the question about whether torture is right or wrong let alone whether it works. >> brown: let me ask you very briefly in our last 30 seconds. your fear here is that this portrayal will impact public understanding and possibly policy? >> i think pop culture is incredibly powerful. i think the t.v. show "24" if you look at the numbers changed public opinion and made people much more comfortable with torture. >> brown: mark, do you think this will affect public policy and perception? >> i think it will affect the way people remember this story. i personally didn't take away, as jane has, a strong mess on the subject of torture one way or the other. i did, for instance, from the show "24" which is clearly pro-torture, not from this, though. >> brown: mark bowden and jan mayer, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> brown: we have an extended interview with director catherine bi
CBS
Jan 12, 2013 5:00am PST
this morning kronltd john miller, a former assistant to the fbi who served in the nypd and the lapd both. john, let me start with you. what do you think is going to come out of this? >> this is going to be a big uphill battle and it has many moving parts. if you want to put an armed police officer or security in every skier. i think they want to get back what they lost which is an assaults weapon ban and ban on high-capacity magazines. the question is if they get back what they lost lrks it make a difference which wasn't much? how do you take the lessons of last time, tweak it and make a difference. >> the other question is we know congress has not wanted to wrestle with this issue for quite some time. is it worth it if it's not going to be productive? >> you don't know that until you've been wrestling. the last time they had such a run-up to it the gun industry flooded the market with the weapons that would be banned bus what was implied in the law was if you had it before the ban, you could keep it and when the ban expired after ten years they flooded the market ag
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 9:00am EST
are people who have been cleared for transfer, that the cia and department justice and the fbi and the burden of defense has looked at and concluded that we're not going to prosecute them, we don't have evidence and we don't believe they present a significant risk and we don't want to keep them. but they have been sitting year after year at guantanamo because of their citizenship. trust the yemeni government to be responsible for the detainee's which i find interesting. the justification for the drone program is that we have the consent of the yemeni government. they are defined government when they give consent to kill people but not trust for the one comes to taking detainee's. it seems we are a bit hypocritical in our view of yemen. i think guantanamo remains a stain on our reputation. recently, congress passed a bill that prohibits granting visas to members of the russian government who abuse human rights violations. president obama signed it. in retaliation, the russian government passed a bill that prohibits americans from adopting russian children and president vladimir putin before s
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)